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http://www.stanford.edu/dept/CDC/students/jobhunt/web/Resume.htm

Job Search Strategies

Resume Guidelines

 

PRINTABLE VERSION

 
Overview
Getting Started 
Sections of a Resume
References(sample)
International Students 
Resume Format and Layout
Resume Technology 
Sample Action Words 
Sample General Resume
Sample Chronological Resume
Sample Chronological Resume II
Sample Functional Resume
Sample Combination Resume
Sample Electronic Resume
CDC Resources
"Keep in mind that prospective employers will spend less than 30 seconds reviewing your resume. You must keep it clear, concise, and focused on the information that will sell you best." 

Resumes! Resumes! Resumes! Editors of Career Press.

 

OVERVIEW

 
A resume is a brief summary of your qualifications, skills and background which represents your education and experiences in terms relevant to the employment marketplace. The purpose of a resume is to obtain an interview, at which you will have an opportunity to describe in person what you can contribute to the organization. Therefore, it is important for your resume to represent you in a clear, well-organized, and easy-to-read style. Your resume should focus on results you have produced, using action verbs to indicate clearly the skills you used. Resumes should almost always be accompanied by a cover letter. (See Cover Letter Guidelines guide.)

 

GETTING STARTED

You will find that everyone has a different opinion on how to write an effective resume. When given advice, ask the reasoning behind the suggestion, so that you can make your own informed decision about format, style and layout. In the final analysis, you are the best judge of what makes the most convincing case for your unique talents.

To begin, recall and gather information about yourself. Write down the most salient details of your experiences including pertinent coursework, paid and volunteer work experiences, awards, clubs, research projects, and special skills. You can always delete those experiences and activities that are not relevant to the position you are seeking.

 

SECTIONS OF A RESUME

 
 

Identifying Information

The top of the resume should include:

• Name.

• Current address & telephone number, including area code.

• Permanent address and phone number if pertinent.

• Email address, if available.
• Optional: your Web page address.

Objective

Although the objective is optional, it has the advantage of telling the recruiter or hiring manager, at a glance, the type of position you are seeking.

The resume objective can take many forms. It can state: 1) the specific position you are seeking, 2) the skills you wish to use on the job, 3) the field or organization type by which you wish to be employed, or very often, a combination of all of the above. It is important to strike a balance between too much and too little information. It is also important to provide enough specific information for the reader to determine where to direct your resume. Your in-depth employment objective is reserved for the cover letter. Avoid phrases like ". . . a position in public relations or advertising." If you are applying in different fields, use a separate resume with an objective appropriate for each field.
 
 

Sample Objectives

Position stated:

• A position as an editorial assistant.

• Seeking a position as an entry level electrical engineer.

• Media Relations Manager. 

Position and interest areas stated: • A position as an editorial assistant in magazine publishing.

• Seeking a position as an electrical engineer in research and design.

• A program coordinator position in a community organization working with youth.

• An entry level computer programming position leading to program design. 

Skills and organization type stated: • A fund development position in a nonprofit organization, requiring creativity with strong oral/written communication and organization skills. 

• To obtain a position in investment banking using excellent quantitative and analytical skills.

• A summer internship preparing cell cultures in the biotechnology industry.

• To apply decision and systems analysis to strategic planning in telecommunications.

  Education

As a current student or recent graduate of Stanford University, you will probably want to highlight your education by placing this section near the top of your resume. This section must include the first three items listed below. The other entries are optional.

• Names of the degree granting institutions, listing first the most recent degree earned.

• Degree received and major.

• Graduation date or projected graduation date, or dates of attendance if no degree was completed.

• Any minors, specialization or focus areas.

• Overseas academic experiences.

• Courses that are relevant to the positions for which you are applying.

• Honors and GPA are optional, although recommended if they are a strong selling point. Be sure to indicate GPA as based on a 4.0 scale. (e.g., 3.6/4.0)

• Senior research/honors thesis title and often a brief description. This can also be listed in the EXPERIENCE section, if relevant.

• Unless your are a freshman or sophomore, high school is not generally listed. Exceptions do exist: if you received an award especially relevant to your job objective, if you attended an extremely noteworthy high school, or if you are applying for a job in the geographic region of your high school.

Experience

When describing your experiences, include:

• Title of the position.

• Name of organization and location with city and state.

• Dates of employment/involvement.

• Description of responsibilities beginning with action verbs. (Avoid phrases such as "Duties included . . .")
• Mention believable, verifiable accomplishments.

Suggestions for Describing Your Experiences • Describe your experiences in terms of accomplishments including the variety of tasks performed and progressive increases in responsibility.

• Be action oriented. Begin each sentence with an action verb (organized, developed, directed, etc.) See p.8 for more examples of action verbs.

• Use nouns that convey key skills or knowledge areas (e.g., familiar with C++, proficient with Excel, fluent in Spanish).

• Keep personal pronouns out of your descriptions

.• Quantify your experience whenever possible to demonstrate the scope of your responsibilities. For example, "planned and managed a budget of $10,000" or "supervised a crew of four."

• Include paid jobs, internships, volunteer community service, extracurricular projects involving leadership or teamwork, special academic research or honors projects, etc.
 
 

High school experiences are usually more appropriate for freshman and sophomore students. However, important high school experiences which have some relevance to your job objective, and are not repeated or expanded upon in college, may be appropriate. If in doubt, include it and ask for feedback from an objective person critiquing your resume. In the final analysis, use your best sense of what presents you in strong, clear, succinct terms.
 
 

Additional Information (Optional)

This section can include languages, computer skills, interests, sports, extracurricular activities, volunteer experiences, etc. However, if one of these areas is especially relevant to your objective, you may choose to put it into a separate section (see below).
 
 Other Possibilities for Sections

Choose your headings based on your background and the qualifications you believe will be important or of interest to the employer. Be descriptive in your selection of a heading. Sample headings may include:
 
 

• Computer skills

• Lab skills

• Languages

• Leadership or Teamwork Activities

• Honors and Awards

• Professional Affiliations

• Community Service

• Outstanding Accomplishments

• Summary (usually included near the top, listing specific skills, past experience, etc.)

 

 

References

If references would be well known to your reader, you may want to include their names on your resume. Usually, if references are requested, a separate reference sheet is paper clipped to your resume (or presented later in your job search if you are a finalist for a position). This should have your name at the top and list the names, titles, addresses and phone numbers of your references. Remember: it is important to contact your references prior to submitting their names to potential employers.

Sample Reference Sheet

JANE SMITH

REFERENCES


 
 

Dr. Jan

Professor Department of Biological Sciences

Stanford University

Stanford, CA 94305

650.725.3218
 
 

Jerome Titan

Senior Scientist

Genentech

1204 Lloyd Street South

San Francisco, CA 94080

650.225.9999
 
 

Vanessa Jean

Manager

The Gap

1999 Main Street

Hometown, XX 12345

650.321.5000

 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

It is often a disadvantage to include your non-immigrant visa status or permanent address (if outside the U.S.) on your resume. If a company is interested in you, the subject of your visa status should be discussed later during the interview. The only exception would be if you have obtained permanent residency. In this case, it is an advantage to list your permanent residency status on your resume.
 
 

 

RESUME FORMAT AND LAYOUT 

There is no single, best way to set up your resume - the resume format you choose should present your strengths clearly. There are three basic resume formats: chronological, functional/skills, and combination. 1. Chronological Format Presents your experience and education in reverse chronological sequence, starting with the most recent. Date, job title, organization's name, location and a description of your activities are listed as part of the experience section. This format is simple, straightforward, and is especially useful for anyone with a history of directly relevant experiences. Employers usually feel most comfortable with this type of presentation of academic and employment information. See Sample Chronological Resume. 2. Functional/Skills Format Focuses on areas of skill. This format draws attention to accomplishments and highlights your skills rather than your work experience. It is more commonly used by people returning to the workplace after being away or otherwise involved; where accomplishments rather than a chronological presentation of work experience is more effective. When using a functional format, you place your accomplishments, clustered into functional areas, in your EXPERIENCE section, with an additional section titled EMPLOYMENT HISTORY. In this section, briefly list the titles, dates and organizations where you gained your experiences. See books such as Resumes that Mean Business, Princeton Review's Trashproof Resumes, or National Business Employment Weekly's Resumes for examples (on CDC reserve). See also Sample Functional Resume 3. Combination Format Combines both the chronological and functional formats. This format allows you to group your experiences or key selling points together by functional areas (such as RESEARCH EXPERIENCE and TEACHING EXPERIENCE) and then list those experiences chronologically within each section. Be sure to be logical and organized in structuring this type of resume so that it is easy to follow. This format is appropriate when you have relevant work experience for each of several skill areas. See Sample Combination Resume

RESUME TECHNOLOGY

Resume writing is still basically a matter of putting words on paper in an organized and persuasive way. Many organizations screen resumes using optical scanners, while an increasing number of employers are accepting resumes via email, World Wide Web, electronic newsgroups, and fax. Optical Scanning Optical or electronic scanning technology allows organizations to handle large amounts of information on incoming job applicants by scanning resumes for key words which indicate skills, education, and knowledge areas the employer is seeking. Your resume is scanned into the computer as an image. Optical character recognition (OCR) sorts the image into recognizable letters, words, and symbols. Don't discard your conventional resume, as it can be effective once your resume has passed scanners and is read by a hiring manager.

Suggestions for Success with Scanning Technology

• Use laser printing, with black ink on white or light-colored 8.5 X 11 paper. Clear contrast improves recognition.
• Use standard fonts where none of the characters touch each other. Such fonts include: Times, Palatino, Helvetica and New Century Schoolbook.
• Underlining, italics, or fancy scripts may not scan accurately.
• Use boldface and/or all capital letters for section headings and emphasis, as long as the letters don’t touch each other. At least 1/4" is required between all lines and typeface.
• Columns, centering and indentations may be changed when converted to optically scanned text.• Stay within 10-14 point font size.
• If you use bullets, include a space after the bullet.
• Use only one side of the page. One to two pages are usually acceptable, if succinct and clear. Keep vitally important information on page 1.
• Place your name at the top of each page on its own line. On the first page, use standard address format and list each telephone number on its own line.
• Use multiple synonyms for the same skills to be sure your qualifications are picked up.
• Be descriptive in your titles so your experiences are not missed; i.e., Programming Intern or Legal Office Assistant as opposed to intern or assistant.
• Mail a laser print original or excellent copy. Paper clip pages together. Do not fold or staple.
The Importance of Keywords

The scanner searches your credentials for keywords which describe your education, experience, skills, knowledge areas, and professional affiliations. Every occupation and career field has its own jargon, acronyms and buzzwords. You can compile a list of keywords for your field using the Occupational Outlook Handbook (on CDC Reserve), job announcements and organizations' Web sites. Also remember there are general keywords that apply to transferrable skills important in many jobs, such as: teamwork, writing, planning, coordinating, designing, etc. If you are responding to a job listing, use words from the job listing in your resume and cover letter. In addition, conducting information interviews with people in the field can be highly effective in "learning the language" of your intended field. (See Networking: The Most Effective Job Search Technique guide and access Stanford's Alumni Contact Service at http://sunsite.stanford.org/SOLAR.)

Preparing Two Versions It is useful to prepare two resumes, one for scanning purposes with a scannable format and detailed information, and the other for people to read during a face-to-face interview. The second could include a more creative layout, enhanced typography and summarized information. Fax It is now common to find job listings with instructions to "fax resume." The advantage of faxing is that it allows you to respond instantly to a hiring notice or hiring manager's request for additional information. In some offices, faxed material tends to be read more often or faster than material arriving by mail. However, the quality of a fax machine is usually low. Use a cover sheet, fax both a resume and cover letter, and note that a printed copy of your resume and cover letter will follow in the mail. Email, World Wide Web and Newsgroups Resumes sent online should be left-aligned with no formatting (no tabs, bold, columns, italics or underlines). Any elements of style to direct your reader's attention should come from text items such as capitals, spacing and characters such as *** or <<< >>>. How your resume looks on-screen and prints on paper is dependent upon your receiver's email program, margins, and font settings. The same resume sent to 25 different email addresses can have 25 different "looks" with the same content. Send your resume in ASCII text, as it can be recognized by PC's, Mac's, workstations and mainframes, providing the best chance for getting your resume entered into most searchable databases. Do not send your resume as an attachment. Although it may look better to you, employers often scan email text for keywords, and your attachment may not be recognized by their computer. Be sure to email yourself a copy before sending it to an employer. See Sample Electronic Resume (p.14).As resumes are reduced to ASCII characters and keywords, your cover letter becomes more important as a way to communicate who you are and what you can contribute to the organization. Your cover letter should supplement, not repeat the information in your resume. See Writing Effective Cover Letters guide.In general, Human Resources professionals say they prefer resumes sent by email, as they do not have time to access resumes on the Web (unless you are applying for a job such as Web page designer). If you do decide a Web resume might be useful to prepare, be sure to keep it current, on a single Web page, using a keyword summary at the beginning, and avoiding excessive hyperlinks that distract viewers from their primary intention - deciding whether to contact you for and interview.

 

Sample Action Verbs Listed By Functional Skill Area

 

Financial 

Administered

Allocated

Analyzed

Appraised

Audited

Budgeted

Calculated

Computed

Developed

Evaluated

Figured

Maintained

Managed

Performed

Planned

Bookkeeping

Prepared

Projected

 

Manual Skills

Arranged

Assembled

Bound

Built

Checked

Classified

Constructed

Controlled

Cut

Designed

Developed

Drove

Handled

Installed

Invented

Maintained

Monitored

Prepared

Operated

Repaired

Tested

 

Providing Service

Advised

Attended

Cared

Coached

Coordinated

Counseled

Delivered

Demonstrated

Explained

Furnished

Generated

Inspected

Installed

Issued

Mentored

Referred

Repaired

Provided

Purchased

Submitted

Organizing 

Achieved

Assigned

Administered

Consulted

Contracted

Controlled

Coordinated

Decided

Delegated

Developed

Directed

Established

Evaluated

Led

Negotiated

Organized

Planned

Prioritized

Produced

Recommended

Reported

Communication

Aided

Arbitrated

Advised

Clarified

Consulted

Contributed

Cooperated

Coordinated

Counseled

Debated

Defined

Directed

Enlisted

Explained

Expressed

Helped

Influenced

Informed

Inspired

Interpreted

Interviewed

Mediated

Merged

Negotiated

Promoted

Recommended

Represented

Resolved

Suggested
 
 

 

Creative

Acted

Abstracted

Adapted

Composed

Conceptualized

Created

Designed

Developed

Directed

Drew

Fashioned

Generated

Illustrated

Imagined

Improvised

Integrated

Innovated

Painted

Performed

Planned

Problem solved

Shaped 

Synthesized

Visualized

Wrote

Detail Oriented

Analyzed

Approved

Arranged

Classified

Collated

Compared

Compiled

Documented

Enforced

Followed through

Met deadlines

Prepared

Processed

Recorded

Retrieved

Set priorities

Systemized

Tabulated

 

SAMPLE GENERAL RESUME 

(Helvetica 12pt)
NAME



 
 

Present Address:

Street name & number or PO BOX

City, State ZIP

Phone, including area code

Email: jane@domain.com 

Permanent Address:

999 Main Street

Peoria, IL 55555

312.555.2345

 
 
 
 
 

Objective

Optional, but must be brief and show focus. Can include employment goals, position interest, skills to be used or industry you are seeking.

Education

List most recent first. State name of university, degree received, major, minor or special focus areas. You may want to include your GPA (X.X/4.0), Honors Project and list any relevant coursework.

Experience

List most recent experience first. Include dates, job title, name of organization, and description of responsibilities. Be action oriented, including skills and verbs that are transferable to the work you are seeking. Use numbers to show scope of responsibility. Include both paid and unpaid work, class projects if relevant to the position sought, varsity athletic experience which required significant commitment, etc.

Skills

Include special skills or relevant talents showing initiative, resourcefulness, leadership - something you’d like the employer to know about you. Language fluency, computer knowledge, lab skills, etc.

Affiliations

State professional associations, organizations, offices held, honors or awards received. 

Community Service or Extracurricular Activities

College or community projects indicating commitment, interests, values, teamwork, initiative, etc.

 

SAMPLE CHRONOLOGICAL RESUME

(Times 10pt)



Janet Campbell
 
 
 
 

EDUCATION

Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

Bachelor of Arts in International Relations with a focus on the European Union, degree anticipated June, 199X.

Coursework: economics, statistics, computer science, organizational behavior. GPA 3.7/4.0.

Stanford in Washington, Washington, D.C.

Completed intensive tutorial and internship on international trade.

Oxford University, Oxford, England. Studied monetary policy of European Union.

EXPERIENCE

Resident Assistant, Madera House, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 9/9X-present.

Work with a staff of four resident assistants in an 88-student dorm. Create, plan and organize activities for the students. Encourage and facilitate social, political and ethical student discussions. Coordinator for "Madera Makes Music," a weekly educational program. Schedule performances, develop and monitor budget and create publicity.

Research Assistant, Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, Washington, D.C., 1/9X-5/9X.

Researched Latin American trading blocs. Analyzed trade patterns and produced summary briefs on trade developments. Maintained database using FileMaker.

Goalie, Women's Water Polo Team, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 9/9X-present.

Practice 15 hours/week. Participate in team drills and coordinate defensive team strategies. Assist team captain with travel arrangements. Have developed ability to work with a team under pressure.

(Could alternatively be placed in the Additional Information section.)

Vice President, Delta Gamma Sorority, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 9/9X-6/9X.

Directed, planned and implemented activities for 95 chapter members. Planned and managed budget of $5000. Increased member participation through innovative motivational techniques. Created prototype for annual chapter retreat and member recognition program. Organized rush activities.

Legal Assistant, Law Offices of Garcia, Hernandez, and Harrison, Sacramento, CA, 6/9X-9/9X.

Sorted and catalogued proceedings, correspondence, and information related to race discrimination cases. Conducted document research and initial intake interviews with prospective clients. Summarized depositions, produced correspondence, answered phones. Gained proficiency with MSWord and FileMaker Pro.

Student Operator, Stanford Instructional Television Network, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 199X-9X. 

Taped classroom instruction, operated camera and audio equipment as a work-study position during academic year.

Entrepreneur, The Sewing Studio, Durham, CA, summers, 199X-9X.

Created successful business offering fashion design and clothing construction courses to home-sewers. Averaged $5000 revenue each summer. Developed advertising strategies, coordinated class schedules, and taught classes.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

• Computer skills: MSWord, Excel, PageMaker, FileMaker Pro.

• Proficient in French.

• Member: Haas Public Service Advisory Board, 199X-199X.

• Staff Member, Stanford Quad Yearbook, 199X-199X.

• Have financed a significant portion of educational expenses through scholarships, loans, and summer/academic year employment.

 

SAMPLE CHRONOLOGICAL RESUME 2

IMA JOBSEEKER


EDUCATION

9/9X-Present Stanford University, Stanford, CA

Expected Bachelor of Arts in Sociology, 6/9X

Pursuing a minor in English [optional]. Coursework includes: economics, statistics, computer science.

GPA 3.7/4.0 [GPA is optional] 

3/9X-6/9X Stanford-in-Washington Program, Washington, DC

[Might also mention: Overseas programs, summer school coursework, other universities attended, etc.]

EXPERIENCE

9/9X-Present Resident Assistant, Casa Zapata, Stanford University, Stanford, CA

Work with a team of 4 resident assistants in a 90-student, four-class dorm. Create, plan, and organize academic, cultural, and social activities for student residents. Enhance community spirit and guide residents in assuming responsibility for their personal and communal lives. Position attained through competitive selection process.

6/9X-9/9X Legal Assistant, Law Offices of Garcia, Hernandez & Harrison, Sacramento, CA

Sorted and catalogued proceedings, correspondence, and information related to race discrimination cases. Performed document research and conducted initial intake interviews with prospective clients. Summarized depositions, composed correspondence, answered phones. Gained knowledge of Microsoft Word and Filemaker Pro.

1/9X-6/9X Studio Operator, Stanford Instructional Television Network, Stanford, CA

9/9X-6/9X Taped classroom instruction, operated camera and audio equipment.

6/9X-9/9X Research Assistant, United States Trade Council, Washington, DC

Researched Latin American trading blocs. Analyzed trade patterns and produced summary briefs on trade developments. Maintained various internal databases. 

6/9X-9/9X Community Service Intern, Second Harvest Food Bank, San Jose, CA

Led adult volunteers in procuring over 60,000 pounds of fresh produce from farms in the Central Valley. Assisted with food distribution to low-income residents. Analyzed participation in volunteer programs using Excel spreadsheets. Designed and conducted volunteer orientation programs; contributed articles to organization’s monthly newsletter.
 
 

SKILLS

• Computer skills: MSWord, Excel, PageMaker, Filemaker Pro. Avid Internet surfer.

• Language skills: Fluent in Spanish, working knowledge of French. 

• Trained in making presentations, conducting research, writing and editing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

• Other work experience includes: camp counselor, math tutor, retail sales clerk, teacher’s aide.

• Member, Haas Public Service Center Advisory Board, 199X-199X.

• Staff Member, Stanford Quad Yearbook, 199X-199X.

• Have financed substantial portion of educational expenses through scholarships, loans, and summer/academic year employment.

 

SAMPLE FUNCTIONAL RESUME

(Times 10pt)

TERRY Q. CHAN

Present Address

PO BOX 12345

Stanford, CA 94305

650.497.5555

email: TQC@leland.stanford.edu

Permanent Address

1444 Walnut Drive

Home Town, CA 94086

408.555.3333
 
 
 
 

OBJECTIVE To work for an advertising agency or magazine in the area of graphic art/photography.

EDUCATION Stanford University, Stanford, CA. B.A. degree in Art, expected 6/9X

Elective coursework includes math, psychology, and computer science.

SKILLS Conceptualizing - Conceived designs for various publications including newsletters, brochures, booklets and university publications.

Initiating - Assisted with educational costs through self-initiated money-making projects. Designed and printed silk-screen T-shirts for University residence halls; machine-engraved name plaques and key chains; displayed and sold at student bookstore; made framed photographs sold at University crafts fair. Studio art portfolio completed containing 40 slides of recent work.

Printing - Coursework in publications production. Experience in preparing layouts, using copy camera, making plates, and running printing press. Familiar with typesetting, running various machines and collating.

Photography - Coursework and self-acquired knowledge in black and white, and color photography. Shoot both indoor and outdoor candids, groups, nature, and sports pictures. Strong interest in darkroom work, especially darkroom graphics. Familiar with drymounting and matting. Knowledge of photo silk-screen techniques.

Computer - Proficient with Macintosh; familiar with Excel, PageMaker, and MSWord.

WORK EXPERIENCE

9/9X to present Library Assistant - Meyer Library, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

Summers-199X & 199X Sales Associate - Franklin Frame Shop, Sunnyvale, CA.

9/9X - 6/9X Clerical Assistant - William Carpenter & Associates (Architectural Firm) Palo Alto, CA.

9/9X - 6/9x Food Service Worker - Central Food Service, Stanford, CA.

OTHER EXPERIENCE

Tutor, Teacher’s Aide, Lifeguard

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Fluent in Italian, working knowledge of French. Interests include calligraphy, ceramics, and competitive volleyball. Traveled extensively in Europe and Asia.

SAMPLE COMBINATION RESUME

(Times 10pt)

Dana Jackson

PO BOX 12345

Stanford, CA 94309

650.555.1234

dana@leland.stanford.edu
 
 
 
 

SUMMARY

Excellent written communication skills and ability to work with a team.• Proficient with CricketGraph, MSWord, Excel, FileMaker, and PageMaker.• Experienced lab technician executing DNA sequencing and gene analysis. EDUCATION Stanford University, Stanford, CA. B.A. in Human Biology, June 199X.Coursework: Organic Chemistry, Physics, Statistical Methods, Biology Lab, Human Organism, Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, and Epidemiology. TECHNICAL EXPERIENCE University of Illinois at Chicago Cancer Center, Chicago, IL 6/9X-9/9X.RESEARCH ASSISTANTQuickly learned complicated laboratory procedures. Conducted experiments involving DNA sequencing and gene analysis. Learned gel electrophoresis techniques. Maintained detailed records for procedural and statistical purposes. Gained significant independent research and writing experience. WRITING EXPERIENCE Hoover Institute Public Affairs Office, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 9/9X-present.PUBLIC RELATIONS INTERNCompiled articles from an array of journals, magazines and newspapers. Used PageMaker to create mastheads and produce opinion editorials. Developed efficient proofreading methods and an innovative talent for pasting up difficult articles. The Stanford Daily, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 9/9X-6/9X.FEATURE WRITERDeveloped journalistic writing style and interviewing skills. Successfully met all deadlines and consistently published front page articles. LEADERSHIP and TEACHING EXPERIENCE Self-employed, Palo Alto, CA 10/9X-present.MATH and ENGLISH TUTORTutor two seventh grade girls. Employ the Socratic method to develop their analytical skills and help them with their homework. Design tests to chart their ability. Create interactive games to increase their understanding of math and grammar, and to develop their communication skills.

Black Student Union, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 9/9X-6/9X.OFFICER'S COREWorked with a team to plan, organize, and publicize a range of activities and programs designed to bond, motivate and educate Stanford's African-American community. Established alumni contacts via newsletter to secure financial and mentoring support.

Human Biology Theme House, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 9/9X-6/9X.FOCUS ASSISTANTParticipated on a team of five to recruit speakers and develop well organized, thought-provoking programs.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Working knowledge of Spanish. Interests include ultimate frisbee, skiing, and jazz.
 
 

SAMPLE ELECTRONIC RESUME

(New Century Schoolbook 10pt)

STEVEN GROSSMAN

3 Sandalwood Terrace

Los Altos, CA 94040

650.555.4321

Steven@leland.stanford.edu

<<<OBJECTIVE>>>

Member of a software development team in the areas of operating systems, compilers, graphics, or user interfaces.

<<<KEYWORD OVERVIEW>>>

* Extensive programming experience in OS and VM/CMS on IBM 360/370 and 3090 mainframe computer systems as well as Pascal, Fortran, PL/1, IBM TSO CLIST, SPF and JCL languages.

* Detailed training and moderate experience in programming with Macintosh, IBM AS/400, Unix on VAX 8800 computer as well as C, C++, MC68000 Assembler, Ada, LISP, Scheme, Prolog and SmallTalk languages.

* 5 years experience in software development, requirements analysis, testing and verification of small, medium and very large scientific applications.

* 2 years experience in budget analysis and planning.

* 4 years of practical teamwork and leadership experience in management training in Naval ROTC.

* Strong analytical and teaching skills.

<<<EDUCATION>>>

STANFORD UNIVERSITY, Stanford, CA.

M.S. Computer Science expected, 6/9X.

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, CA.

Completed 7 courses in Artificial Intelligence Program, 2/9X-6/9X.

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, CA.

B.S. Aerospace Engineering, 6/9X.

<<<EXPERIENCE>>>

COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT, STANFORD UNIVERSITY, Stanford, CA, 9/9X-present.

TEACHING ASSISTANT: Assisted professor in teaching Macintosh 68000 Assembly Language class. Designed, created and graded assembly language programming assignments.

ROLM SYSTEMS, Santa Clara, CA 6/9X-9/9X.

SOFTWARE TEST ENGINEER: Worked with a team to create and execute system error recovery test plan for AS/400 to CBX application. Prepared requirements and coordinated setup of lab equipment.

ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL, Downey, CA 2/9X-9/9X.

TECHNICAL STAFF: Created and maintained simulation, data analysis and software evaluation tools. Tested and verified requirements for Space Shuttle Navigation System.

 

CDC RESOURCES

 

Listed are additional guides also available with resume advice for specific situations. - Internships and Summer Jobs Resource Packet (includes sample summer resume)

- Curriculum Vitae and Cover Letters (for academic job searchers)

- PhD Pathways: Exploring Your Career Options

- Resumes and Cover Letters for Master's Level Students

- Teaching K-12

CDC SUGGESTED READING
- Be Your Own Headhunter Online, Dixon and Tiersten.
- Damn Good Ready to Go Resumes, Parker.

- Electronic Resume Revolution, Kennedy.

- Electronic Resumes for the New Job Market, Weddle.

- Encyclopedia of Job-Winning Resumes, Fourier and Spin.

- From College to Career, Asher.

- Heart & Soul Resumes, Cochran and Peerce.

- Hook Up, Get Hired! The Internet Job Search Revolution, Kennedy.

- Internet Resumes, Weddle.

- Resumes, National Business Employment Weekly.

- Resumes That Knock 'Em Dead, Yate.

- Resumes That Mean Business, Eyler.

- The Smart Woman's Guide to Resumes and Job Hunting, King and Sheldon.

-Trashproof Resumes, Princeton Review.

- Use the Internet to Land Your Dream Job!, Goodwin, Cohn, and Spivey.
 
 

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